Abraham Lincoln Quotes

"A house divided against itself cannot stand." I believe this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. "A House Divided" speech at Springfield, Illinois, June 16, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 461, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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"Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh!" If we shall suppose that American Slavery is one of those offences which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South, this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offence came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a Living God always ascribe to Him? Fondly do we hope—fervently do we pray—that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue, until all the wealth piled by the bond-man's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall be paid by another with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said "the judgments of the Lord, are true and righteous altogether."
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Second inaugural address, March 4, 1865. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 333, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Every man is said to have his peculiar ambition. Whether it be true or not, I can say for one that I have no other so great as that of being truly esteemed of my fellow men....
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. communication to the people of Sangamo County Mar. 9, 1832. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 8, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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There is a vague popular belief that lawyers are necessarily dishonest. I say vague, because when we consider to what extent confidence and honors are reposed in and conferred upon lawyers by the people, it appears improbable that their impression of dishonesty is very distinct and vivid. Yet the impression is common, almost universal.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment, notes for a law lecture, July 1, 1850? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 81, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I hope to "stand firm" enough to not go backward, and yet not go forward fast enough to wreck the country's cause.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Zachariah Chandler, Nov. 20, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 24, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I think the authors of that notable instrument [the Declaration of Independence] intended to include all men.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech at Springfield, Illinois, June 26, 1857. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 405, Rutgers University Press (1955, 1990).
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I shall do less whenever I shall believe what I am doing hurts the cause, and I shall do more whenever I shall believe doing more will help the cause. I shall try to correct errors when shown to be errors; and I shall adopt new views so fast as they shall appear to be true views.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Horace Greeley, Aug. 22, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol.5, p. 388, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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The issue is a mighty one for all people and all time; and whoever aids the right, will be appreciated and remembered.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Abram Wakeman, July 25, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 461, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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If I had my way, this war would never have been commenced. If I had been allowed my way this war would have been ended before this.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Eliza P. Gurney, Oct. 26, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 478, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Although volume upon volume is written to prove slavery a very good thing, we never hear of the man who wishes to take the good of it, by being a slave himself.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment on slavery, July 1, 1854? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 222, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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