Abraham Lincoln Quotes

Our common country is in great peril, demanding the loftiest views, and boldest action to bring it speedy relief.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Appeal to border state representatives to favor compensated emancipation (July 12, 1862). Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 319, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Although what I am now to say is to be, in form, a reprimand, it is not intended to add a pang to what you have already suffered.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James M. Cutts, Jr., Oct. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 538, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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You have confidence in yourself, which is valuable, if not an indispensable quality.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joseph Hooker, Jan. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 78, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990). Preliminary words to calling a general on the carpet.
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Perhaps you have forgotten me. Dont [sic] you remember a long black fellow who rode on horseback with you from Tremont to Springfield nearly ten years ago, swimming your horses over the Mackinaw on the trip? Well, I am that same one fellow yet.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Josephus Hewett, Feb. 13, 1848. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 450, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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If there is ANY THING which it is the duty of the WHOLE PEOPLE to never entrust to any hands but their own, that thing is the preservation and perpetuity, of their own liberties, and institutions.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Peoria, Illinois, Oct. 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 270, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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You have constantly urged the idea that you were persecuted because you did not come from West-Point, and you repeat it in these letters. This, my dear general, is I fear, the rock on which you have split.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Robert H. Milroy, June 29, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 308, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Remembering that when not a very great man begins to be mentioned for a very great position, his head is very likely to be a little turned, I concluded I am not the fittest person to answer the questions you ask.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Richard M. Corwine, Apr. 6, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 36, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I go for all sharing the privileges of the government, who assist in bearing its burthens.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to the editor of Sangamo Journal, June 13, 1836. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 48, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Without the Constitution and the Union, we could not have attained the result; but even these, are not the primary cause of our great prosperity. There is something back of these, entwining itself more closely about the human heart. That something, is the principle of "Liberty to all"Mthe principle that clears the path for all—gives hope to all—and, by consequence, enterprize [sic], and industry to all.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment on the Constitution and Union, c. Jan. 1861? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 168, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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By his mere quiet power, on the minds of the now contestants, He could have either saved or destroyed the Union without a human contest. Yet the contest began. And having begun He could give the final victory to either side any day. Yet the contest proceeds.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. meditation on the divine will, Sep. 2, 1862? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 403, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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