Abraham Lincoln Quotes

The matter of fees is important, far beyond the mere question of bread and butter involved. Properly attended to, fuller justice is done to both lawyer and client.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment, notes for a law lecture, July 1, 1850? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 81, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I certainly know that if the war fails, the administration fails, and that I will be blamed for it, whether I deserve it or not. And I ought to be blamed, if I could do better. You think I could do better; therefore you blame me already. I think I could not do better; therefore I blame you for blaming me.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Carl Schurz, Nov. 24, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 509, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I can only say that I have acted upon my best convictions without selfishness or malice, and that by the help of God, I shall continue to do so.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Agenor-Etienne de Gasparin, Aug. 4, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 356, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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You have too much of a life yet before you, and have shown too much of promise as an officer, for your future to be lightly surrendered.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James M. Cutts, Jr., Oct. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 538, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Thus let bygones be bygones. Let past differences, as nothing be.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at a Republican banquet, Chicago, Illinois, Dec. 10, 1856. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 385, Rutgers University Press (1955, 1990).
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Much is being said about peace; and no man desires peace more ardently than I. Still I am yet unprepared to give up the Union for a peace which, so achieved, could not be of much duration.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Isaac M. Schermerhorn, Sep. 12, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 1, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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We have all heard of Young America. He is the most current youth of the age. Some think him conceited, and arrogant; but has he not reason to entertain a rather extensive opinion of himself? Is he not the inventor and owner of the present, and sole hope of the future?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. second lecture on discoveries and inventions, Feb. 11, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 356, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Your good mother tells me you are feeling very badly in your new situation. Allow me to assure you it is a perfect certainty that you will, very soon, feel better—quite happy—if you only stick to the resolution you have taken to procure a military education. I am older than you, have felt badly myself, and know, what I tell you is true. Adhere to your purpose and you will soon feel as well as you ever did.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Quintin Campbell, June 28, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 288, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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But let the past as nothing be. For the future my view is that the fight must go on.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Norman B. Judd, Nov. 15, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 336, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I am glad I made the late race. It gave me a hearing on the great and durable question of the age, which I could have had in no other way; and though I now sink out of view, and shall be forgotten, I believe I have made some marks which will tell for the cause of civil liberty long after I am gone.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Anson G. Henry, Nov. 19, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 339, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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