Abraham Lincoln Quotes

The fiery trial through which we pass, will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. annual message to Congress, Dec. 1, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 537, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
In this sad world of ours, sorrow comes to all; and, to the young, it comes with bitterest agony, because it takes them unawares. The older have learned to ever expect it.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Fanny McCullough, Dec. 23, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 16, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
Allow me to assure you, that suspicion and jealousy never did help any man in any situation.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to William H. Herndon, July 10, 1848. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1. P. 497, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
The power of hope upon human exertion, and happiness, is wonderful.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment on free labor, Sep. 17, 1859? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 462, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
The political horizon looks dark and lowering; but the people, under Providence, will set all right.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Peter H. Silvester, Dec. 22, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 160, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
I expect to maintain this contest until successful, or till I die, or am conquered, or my term expires, or Congress or the country forsakes me.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to William H. Seward, June 28, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 292, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
I was losing interest in politics, when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again. What I have done since then is pretty well known.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
In this contest, mere men are nothing.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. notes for speeches at Columbus and Cincinnati, Ohio, Sep. 16 and 17, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 433, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
Beware of rashness. Beware of rashness, but with energy, and sleepless vigilance, go forward, and give us victories.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Joseph Hooker, Jan. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 78, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
These men ask for just the same thing—fairness, and fairness only. This, so far as in my power, they, and all others, shall have.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Leonard Swett, May 30, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 57, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).