Abraham Lincoln Quotes

Legislation and adjudication must follow, and conform to, the progress of society.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Notes of argument in law case, June 15, 1858? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 459, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Neither party expected for the war, the magnitude, or the duration, which it has already attained. Neither anticipated that the cause of the conflict might cease with, or even before, the conflict itself should cease.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Second inaugural address, March 4, 1865. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 332, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Surely He intends some great good to follow this mighty convulsion which no mortal could make, and no mortal could stay.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Eliza P. Gurney, Sep. 4, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 535, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Let every American, every lover of liberty, every well wisher to his posterity, swear by the blood of the Revolution, never to violate in the least particular, the laws of the country; and never to tolerate their violation by others.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, Jan. 27, 1838. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 112, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Slavery is founded in the selfishness of man's nature—opposition to it, is [in?] his love of justice.... Repeal the Missouri compromise—repeal all compromises—repeal the declaration of independence—repeal all past history, you still can not repeal human nature. It still will be the abundance of man's heart, that slavery extension is wrong; and out of the abundance of his heart, his mouth will continue to speak.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Peoria, Illinois, Oct. 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 271, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Yours of the 24th, asking "the best mode of obtaining a thorough knowledge of the law" is received. The mode is very simple, though laborious, and tedious. It is only to get the books, and read, and study them carefully.... Work, work, work, is the main thing.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to John M. Brockman, Sep. 25, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 121, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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[With the Union saved] its form of government is saved to the world; its beloved history, and cherished memories, are vindicated; and its happy future fully assured, and rendered inconceivably grand.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Appeal to border state representatives to favor compensated emancipation, July 12, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 319, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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We want, and must have, a national policy, as to slavery, which deals with it as being wrong.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. notes for speeches at Columbus and Cincinnati, Ohio, Sep. 16 and 17, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 435, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Onward and upward.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Sep. 30, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 482, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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You may have a wen or a cancer upon your person and not be able to cut it out lest you bleed to death; but surely it is no way to cure it, to engraft it and spread it over your whole body.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. seventh and last debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Alton, Illinois, Oct. 15, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 313, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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