Abraham Lincoln Quotes

I have just read your dispatch about sore tongued and fatiegued [sic] horses. Will you pardon me for asking what the horses of your army have done since the battle of Antietem that fatigue anything?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to George B. McClellan, Oct. 24, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 474, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Others have been made fools of by the girls; but, this can never be with truth said of me. I most emphatically, in this instance, made a fool of myself.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Mrs. Orville H. Browning, Apr. 1, 1838. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 119, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I have no wealthy or popular relations to recommend me.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. communication to the people of Sangamo County, Mar. 9, 1832. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 8, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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We find ourselves under the government of a system of political institutions, conducing more essentially to the ends of civil and religious liberty, than any of which the history of former times tells us.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, Jan. 27, 1838. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 108, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I am thankful to God for this approval of the people. But while deeply grateful for this mark of their confidence in me, if I know my heart, my gratitude is free from any taint of personal triumph. I do not impugn the motives of any one opposed to me. It is no pleasure to me to triumph over any one.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. response to a serenade, Nov. 8, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 8, p. 96, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Now, at the end of three years struggle the nation's condition is not what either party, or any man devised, or expected. God alone can claim it.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Albert G. Hodges, Apr. 4, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 282, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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God gave man a mouth to receive bread, hands to feed it, and his hand has a right to carry bread to his mouth without controversy.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Hartford, Connecticut, Mar. 5, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 3, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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If there be those who would not save the Union, unless they could at the same time save slavery, I do not agree with them. If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time destroy slavery, I do not agree with them. My paramount objective in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Horace Greeley, Aug. 22, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 388, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990). Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, as he knew that he would, in a month.
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If the good people in their wisdom shall see fit to keep me in the background, I have been too familiar with disappointments to be very much chagrined.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. communication to the people of Sangamo County, Mar. 9, 1832. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 8, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Feb. 22, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 240, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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