Abraham Lincoln Quotes

The true rule, in determining to embrace, or reject any thing, is not whether it have any evil in it; but whether it have more of evil, than of good. There are few things wholly evil, or wholly good.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech in the U.S. House of Representatives on internal improvements, June 20, 1848. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 484, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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We here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Nov. 19, 1863. Gettysburg Address, repr. In Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, ed. Roy P. Basler (1953). The fighting at Gettysburg July 1-3 claimed nearly 50,000 killed or wounded.
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But, slavery is good for some people! ! ! As a good thing, slavery is strikingly peculiar, in this, that it is the only good thing which no man ever seeks the good of, for himself.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment on pro-slavery theology, Oct. 1, 1858? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 205, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I must save this government if possible. What I cannot do, of course I will not do; but it may as well be understood, once for all, that I shall not surrender this game leaving any available card unplayed.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Reverdy Johnson, July 26, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 343, Rutgers University Press (1955, 1990).
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I range the fields with pensive tread, And pace the hollow rooms, And feel (companion of the dead) I'm living in the tombs.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Memory (l. 37-40). . . Best Loved Poems of the American People, The. Hazel Felleman, ed. (1936) Doubleday & Company.
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There is no grievance that is a fit object of redress by mob law.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, Jan. 27, 1838. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 113, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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What would you do in my position? Would you drop the war where it is? Or, would you prosecute it in future, with elderstalk squirts, charged with rose water?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Cuthbert Bullitt, July 28, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 346, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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O memory! thou midway world 'Twixt earth and paradise, Where things decayed and loved ones lost In dreamy shadows rise,
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Memory (l. 5-8). . . Best Loved Poems of the American People, The. Hazel Felleman, ed. (1936) Doubleday & Company.
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As to the whiskers, having never worn any, do you not think people would call it a piece of silly affectation if I were to begin it now?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Grace Bedell, Oct. 19, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 129, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Our reliance is in the love of liberty which God has planted in our bosoms. Our defense is in the preservation of the spirit which prizes liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands, every where.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech at Edwardsville, Illinois, Sep. 11, 1858. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 95, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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