Abraham Lincoln Quotes

I do not think I could myself, be brought to support a man for office, whom I knew to be an open enemy of, and scoffer at, religion. Leaving the higher matter of eternal consequences, between him and his Maker, I still do not think any man has the right thus to insult the feelings, and injure the morals, of the community in which he may live.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Handbill replying to charges of infidelity, July 31, 1846. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 382, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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In the untimely loss of your noble son, our affliction here, is scarcely less than your own.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Ephraim D. and Phoebe Ellsworth, May 25, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 385, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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As a general rule never take your whole fee in advance, nor any more than a small retainer. When fully paid beforehand, you are more than a common mortal if you can feel the same interest in the case, as if something was still in prospect for you, as well as for your client.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment, notes for a law lecture, July 1, 1850? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 81, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sence, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address delivered at the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, final text, Nov. 19, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 23, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Nor must Uncle Sam's Web-feet be forgotten. At all the watery margins they have been present. Not only on the deep sea, the broad bay, and the rapid river, but also up the narrow muddy bayou, and wherever the ground was a little damp, they have been, and made their tracks.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James C. Conkling, Aug. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 409, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Let north and south—let all Americans—let all lovers of liberty everywhere—join in the great and good work. If we do this, we shall not only have saved the Union; but we shall have so saved it, as to make, and to keep it, forever worthy of the saving. We shall have so saved it, that the succeeding millions of free happy people, the world over, shall rise up, and call us blessed, to the latest generations.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech at Peoria, Illinois, October 16, 1854. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 276, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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[The Declaration of Independence] meant to set up a standard maxim for free society, which should be familiar to all, and revered by all; constantly looked to, constantly labored for, and even though never perfectly attained, constantly approximated, and thereby constantly spreading and deepening its influence, and augmenting the happiness and value of life to all people of all colors everywhere.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Speech at Springfield, Illinois, June 26, 1857. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 405, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I was losing interest in politics, when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again. What I have done since then is pretty well known.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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In this contest, mere men are nothing.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. notes for speeches at Columbus and Cincinnati, Ohio, Sep. 16 and 17, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 433, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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The purposes of the Almighty are perfect, and must prevail, though we erring mortals may fail to accurately perceive them in advance.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Eliza P. Gurney, Sep. 4, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 535, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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