Abraham Lincoln Quotes

You may fool all the people some of the time; you can even fool some of the people all the time; but you can't fool all of the people all the time.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Quoted in "Abe" Lincoln's Yarns and Stories, p. 184, Alexander McClure (1904). The famous aphorism has also been attributed to the showman Phineas T. Barnum.
(8) (4)
As to your kind wishes for myself, allow me to say I can not enter the ring on the money basis—first, because, in the main, it is wrong; and secondly, I have not, and can not get, the money. I say, in the main, the use of money is wrong; but for certain objects, in a political contest, the use of some, is both right, and indispensable.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Mark W. Delahay, Mar. 16, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 32, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
(4) (0)
My note to you I certainly did not expect to see in print; yet I have not been much shocked by the newspaper comments upon it. Those comments constitute a fair specimen of what has occurred to me through life. I have endured a great deal of ridicule without much malice; and have received a great deal of kindness, not quite free from ridicule. I am used to it.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James H. Hackett, Nov. 2, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 559, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
(3) (0)
People who like this sort of thing will find this the sort of thing they like.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Quoted in Collections and Recollections, ch. 30, G.W.E. Russell (1898). Referring to "an unreadably sentimental book." According to Gross' Lincoln's Own Stories, Lincoln's remark was to Robert Dale Owen, a spiritualist who had insisted on reading to Lincoln a long manuscript on spiritualism.
(3) (0)
I was born and have ever remaind [sic] in the most humble walks of life.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Communication to the people of Sangamo County, Mar 9, 1832. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 8, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
(8) (0)
It is bad to be poor. I shall go to the wall for bread and meat, if I neglect my business this year as well as last.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Hawkins Taylor, Sep. 6, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 400, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
(8) (0)
I don't know who my grandfather was; I am much more concerned to know what his grandson will be.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Quoted in Gross, Lincoln's Own Stories.
(10) (1)
I affect no contempt for the high eminence he [Senator Stephen Douglas] has reached. So reached, that the oppressed of my species, might have shared with me in the elevation, I would rather stand on that eminence, than wear the richest crown that ever pressed a monarch's brow.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragment on Stephen A. Douglas, Dec. 1856? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 382, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
(5) (0)
We shall yet acknowledge His wisdom and our own error therein.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Eliza P. Gurney, Sep. 4, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 535, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
(5) (0)
Common looking people are the best in the world: that is the reason the Lord makes so many of them.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. quoted in John Hay, Lincoln and the Civil War in the Diaries and Letters of John Hay, entry for Dec. 23, 1863;, ed. Tyler Dennett (1939). Said in a dream in reply to one who had called Lincoln "common looking." Lincoln's words on this occasion have also been given as "The Lord prefers common-looking people. That is the reason He makes so many of them." (Quoted in James Morgan, Our Presidents, ch. 6, 1928.).
(8) (1)