Abraham Lincoln Quotes

The habits of our whole species fall into three great classes—useful labour, useless labour, and idleness. Of these the first only is meritorious; and to it all the products of labor rightfully belong; but the two latter, while they exist, are heavy pensioners upon the first, robbing it of a large portion of its just rights. The only remedy for this is to, as far as possible, drive useless labour and idleness out of existence.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. fragments of a tariff discussion, Dec. 1, 1847? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 412, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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It is not merely for today, but for all time to come that we should perpetuate for our children's children this great and free government, which we have enjoyed all our lives.... I happen temporarily to occupy this big White House. I am a living witness that any one of your children may look to come here as my father's child has. It is in order that each of you may have through this free government which we have enjoyed, an open field and a fair chance for your industry, enterprise and intelligence; that you may all have equal privileges in the race of life, with all its desirable human aspirations.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech to One Hundred Sixty-sixth Ohio Regiment, Aug. 22, 1864. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 7, p. 512, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Let reverence for the laws, be breathed by every American mother, to the lisping babe, that prattles on her lap—let it be taught in schools, in seminaries, and in colleges;Mlet it be written in Primers, spelling books, and in Almanacs;Mlet it be preached from the pulpit, proclaimed in legislative halls, and enforced in courts of justice.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, Jan. 27, 1838. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 112, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I can and will pay it if it is right; but I don't wish to be "diddled!"
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to William M. Dickson, June 7, 1860. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 72, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I was elected a Captain of Volunteers—a success which gave me more pleasure than any I have had since.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to Jesse W. Fell, Dec. 20, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 511, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best, hope of earth.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. annual message to Congress, Dec. 1, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 537, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Thanks to all. For the great republic—for the principle it lives by, and keeps alive—for man's vast future,—thanks to all.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to James C. Conkling, Aug. 26, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 409, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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You already know I desire that neither Father or Mother shall be in want of any comfort either in health or sickness while they live.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to John D. Johnston, Jan. 12, 1851. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 96, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Our political problem now is "Can we, as a nation, continue together permanentlyforever—half slave, and half free?" The problem is too mighty for me. May God, in his mercy, superintend the solution.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to George Robertson, Aug. 15, 1855. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 318, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Understanding the spirit of our institutions to aim at the elevation of man, I am opposed to whatever tends to degrade them.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Theodore Canisius, May 17, 1859. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 380, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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