Abraham Lincoln Quotes

Military glory—the attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Jan. 12, 1848, to the House of Representatives. Arguing against the war with Mexico.
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I am not a very sentimental man; and the best sentiment I can think of is, that if you collect the signatures of all persons who are no less distinguished than I, you will have a very undistinguishing mass of names.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to C.U. Schlater, Jan. 5, 1849. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 19, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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I never did ask more, nor ever was willing to accept less, than for all the States, and the people thereof, to take and hold their places, and their rights, in the Union, under the Constitution of the United States. For this alone have I felt authorized to struggle; and I seek neither more nor less now.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. letter to John A. McClernand, Jan. 8, 1863. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 6, p. 48, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Jan. 27, 1837, Springfield, Illinois. The Perpetuation of Our Political Institutions, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, ed. Roy P. Basler (1953).
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With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves, and with all nations.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865.
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Most governments have been based, practically, on the denial of equal rights of men ... ours began, by affirming those rights. They said, some men are too ignorant, and vicious, to share in government. Possibly so, said we; and, by your system, you would always keep them ignorant, and vicious. We proposed to give all a chance; and we expected the weak to grow stronger, the ignorant wiser; and all better, and happier together.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Fragment on slavery, July 1, 1854? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 222, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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In the present civil war it is quite possible that God's purpose is something different from the purpose of either party.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. meditation on the divine will, Sep. 2, 1862? Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 403, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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What is conservatism? Is it not adherence to the old and tried, against the new and untried?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. speech, Feb. 27, 1860, New York City. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, ed. Roy P. Basler (1953).
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I am in no boastful mood. I shall not do more than I can, and I shall do all I can to save the government, which is my sworn duty as well as my personal inclination. I shall do nothing in malice. What I deal with is too vast for malicious dealing.
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. Letter to Cuthbert Bullitt, July 28, 1862. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 5, p. 346, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better, or equal hope, in the world?
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), U.S. president. first inaugural address, Mar. 4, 1861. Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 4, p. 270, Rutgers University Press (1953, 1990).
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