Aeschylus Quotes

It is an ill thing to be the first to bring news of ill.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Persians, l. 252.
May dawn, as the proverb goes, bring happy tidings coming from her mother night.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 264.
Fear hurries on my tongue through want of courage.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 259.
Willingly no one chooses the yoke of slavery.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 953.
For he does not wish to seem but to be just.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 592.
We must pronounce him fortunate who has ended his life in fair prosperity.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 928.
Never in misfortune nor in prosperity may I share my dwelling with the tribe of women.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 187.
The unenvied man is not enviable.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 939.
We have a man who does not boast, but whose hand sees what must be done.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. The Seven Against Thebes, l. 534.
Be bold and boast, just like the cock beside the hen.
Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), Greek tragedian. Agamemnon, l. 1671.