Alexander Pope Quotes

From pride, from pride, our very reas'ning springs; Account for moral, as for nat'ral things: Why charge we Heav'n in those, in these acquit? In both, to reason right is to submit.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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I know the thing that's most uncommon (Envy be silent and attend!); I know a reasonable woman, Handsome and witty, yet a friend. Not warped by passion, awed by rumour, Not grave through pride, or gay through folly; An equal mixture of good humour And sensible soft melancholy. 'Has she no faults, then (Envy says), sir?' Yes, she has one, I must aver: When all the world conspires to praise her, The woman's deaf, and does not hear.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. On a Certain Lady at Court (l. 1-12). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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All nature is but art unknown to thee; All chance, direction which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good; And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, "Whatever IS, is RIGHT."
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. "An Essay on Man," Epistle i, I. 289 (1773).
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"Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed" was the ninth beatitude.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Oct. 6, 1727, to playwright John Gay. Quoted in Roscoe, Life of Pope, vol. 10.
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some strange comfort every state attend, And pride bestowed on all, a common friend;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Coffee, (which makes the politician wise, And see thro' all things with his half-shut eyes).
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Rape of the Lock, cto. 3, l. 117 (1712).
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Order is Heaven's first law; and this confessed, Some are, and must be, greater than the rest, More rich, more wise; but who infers from hence That such are happier, shocks all common sense. Condition, circumstance, is not the thing; Bliss is the same in subject or in king.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay On Man, epistle 1. See also Samuel Johnson's related comment on "happiness."
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Sir, I admit your gen'ral rule That every poet is a fool: But you yourself may serve to show it, That every fool is not a poet.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Sir, I admit your general rule (attributed to Pope) (l. 1-4). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Hope travels through, nor quits us when we die.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Good God! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Dec. 5, 1732, to poet and author Jonathan Swift. The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, vol. 3, ed. George Sherburn (1956). Written the day after the death of playwright John Gay.
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