Alexander Pope Quotes

Die of a rose in aromatic pain?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. letter, Oct. 19, 1709. The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, vol. 1, ed. George Sherburn (1956).
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Hope springs eternal in the human breast: Man never Is, but always To be blest:
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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She comes! She comes! The sable throne behold Of Night primaeval, and of Chaos old!
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Dunciad (l. 75-81). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Say first, of God above, or Man below, What can we reason, but from what we know? Of Man what see we, but his station here, From which to reason, or to which refer? Thro' worlds unnumber'd tho' the God be known, 'Tis ours to trace him only in our own.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. "An Essay on Man," Epistle i. 17-22 (1773).
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Physic of Metaphysic begs defence, And Metaphysic calls for aid on Sense! See Mystery to Mathematics fly! In vain! they gaze, turn giddy, rave, and die. Religion blushingveils her sacred fires, And unawares Morality expires. Nor public flame, nor private, dares to shine; Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine! Lo! thy dread Empire, Chaos, is restored; Light dies before thy uncreating word: Thy hand, great Anarch, lets the curtain fall; And Universal Darkness buries All.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Dunciad (l. 75-81). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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You beat your pate, and fancy wit will come: Knock as you please, there's nobody at home.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. "Another Epigram," Miscellanies, vol. 3 (1732).
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Religion blushing veils her sacred fires, And unawares Morality expires.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Dunciad, bk. 4, ch. 1, p. 649 (1742).
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Is it, in Heav'n, a crime to love too well? To bear too tender or too firm a heart, To act a lover's or a Roman's part?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady (l. 6-8). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Lo! thy dread empire, Chaos! is restor'd; Light dies before thy uncreating word: Thy hand, great Anarch! lets the curtain fall; And universal darkness buries all.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. The Dunciad, bk. 4, l. 653-6 (1728). Closing lines.
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