Alexander Pope Quotes

Most souls, 'tis true, but peep out once an age, Dull sullen pris'ners in the body's cage: Dim lights of life, that burn a length of years, Useless, unseen, as lamps in sepulchres;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady (l. 17-20). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Tell me, my soul, can this be death?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. "The Dying Christian to his Soul," sect. 237, p. 9 (1713).
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The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Eloisa to Abelard.
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There are (I scarce can think it, but am told) There are, to whom my satire seems too bold:
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The FIrst Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 1-2). NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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How happy is the blameless vestal's lot! The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Eloisa to Abelard, l. 207-8 (1717).
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I love to pour out all my self, as plain As downright Shippen or as old Montaigne:
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace. NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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How shall I lose the sin, yet keep the sense, And love th'offender, yet detest th'offence?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Eloisa to Abelard, l. 191-2 (1717).
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P—xed by her love, or libeled by her hate.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 84). NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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I am his Highness' dog at Kew; Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I Gave to His Royal Highness (1734). Dedicated to Frederick, Prince of Wales.
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Yes, while I live, no rich or noble knave Shall walk the world, in credit, to his grave. To Virtue only and her friends, a friend, The world beside may murmur, or commend.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 119-122). NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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