Alexander Pope Quotes

Cibber! write all thy verses upon glasses, The only way to save 'em from our arses.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epigrams Occasioned by Cibber's Verses in Praise of Nash, no. 2, Minor Poems, eds. Norman Ault and John Butt (1954). Referring to Colley Cibber, dramatist and poet. Cibber (1671-1757) was Poet Laureate for 27 years from 1730, and is generally considered one of the worst poets to hold the office, admitting himself that he was given the post principally for being a good Whig.
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There St. John mingles with my friendly bowl The feast of reason and the flow of soul;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 127-128). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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She, while her lover pants upon her breast, Can mark the figures on an Indian chest.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to a Lady, l. 167-8 (1735).
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Satire's my weapon, but I'm too discreet To run amuck, and tilt at all I meet;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The First Satire of the Second Book of Horace (l. 69-70). NU. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Chaste to her husband, frank to all beside, A teeming mistress, but a barren bride.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to a Lady, l. 71-2 (1735).
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Smooth flow the waves, the zephyrs gently play, Belinda smiled, and all the world was gay.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Most women have no characters at all.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to a Lady, l. 2 (1735). Towards the end of the poem (l. 269-70), Pope writes "And yet, believe me, good as well as ill, Woman's at best a contradiction still."
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The Peer now spreads the glitt'ring Forfex wide, T'inclose the Lock; now joins it, to divide.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Blest paper-credit! last and best supply! That lends corruption lighter wings to fly!
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Bathurst.
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Here files of pins extend their shining rows, Puffs, powders, patches, bibles, billet-doux.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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