Alexander Pope Quotes

Like Cato, give his little Senate laws, And sit attentive to his own applause.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot, l. 209-10 (1735). A portrait of essayist Joseph Addison.
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He saw, he wish'd, and to the prize aspir'd. Resolv'd to win, he meditates the way, By force to ravish, or by fraud betray; For when success a lover's toil attends, Few ask, if fraud or force attain'd his ends.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. "The Rape of the Lock," cto. 2.
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Who but must laugh, if such a man there be? Who would not weep, if Atticus were he?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Whether the nymph shall break Diana's law, Or some frail china jarreceive a flaw, Or stain her honour, or her new brocade,
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer; Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike, Just hint a fault, and hesitate dislike; Alike reserved to blame, or to commend, A timorous foe, and a suspicious friend; Dreading e'en fools, by flatterers besieged, And so obliging, that he ne'er obliged; Like Cato, give his little senate laws, And sit attentive to his own applause:
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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And wretches hang that jury-men may dine;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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But Satan now is wiser than of yore, And tempts by making rich, not making poor.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Lord Bathurst, l. 351-2 (1733).
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With varying vanities, from ev'ry part, They shift the moving toyshop of their heart;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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But thousands die without or this or that, Die, and endow a college, or a cat: To some, indeed, Heaven grants the happier fate, T'enrich a bastard, or a son they hate.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Epistle to Lord Bathurst, l. 95-8 (1733).
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But when to mischiefmortals bend their will, How soon they find fit instruments of ill!
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. The Rape of the Lock (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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