Alexander Pope Quotes

Our sons their fathers' failing language see, And such as Chaucer is shall Dryden be.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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what affects our hearts Is not the exactness of peculiar parts; 'Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call, But the joint force and full result of all.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head. With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always listening to himself appears.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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All comes united to th' admiring eyes;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Fear most to tax an honorable fool, Whose right it is, uncensured to be dull;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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And ten low words oft creep in one dull line:
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Let me tell you I am better acquainted with you for a long absence, as men are with themselves for a long affliction: absence does but hold off a friend, to make one see him the truer.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Letter, December 14, 1725, to poet and author Jonathan Swift.
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A needless Alexandrine ends the song, That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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I find myself ... hoping a total end of all the unhappy divisions of mankind by party-spirit, which at best is but the madness of many for the gain of a few.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Letter, August 27, 1714.
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True wit is Nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed; Something whose truth convinced at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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