Alexander Pope Quotes

Dear, damned, distracting town, farewell!
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. A Farewell to London, l. 1 (1715).
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Th' increasing prospect tires our wand'ring eyes. Hills peep o'er hills, and Alps on Alps arise! A perfect Judge will read each work of Wit With the same spirit that its author writ: Survey the Whole, nor seek slight faults to find Where nature moves, and rapture warms the mind;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay on Criticism, l. 625 (1711).
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Still green with bays each ancient altar stands Above the reach of sacrilegious hands,
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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One science only will one genius fit; So vast is art, so narrow human wit.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay on Criticism, l. 60-1 (1711).
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So much they scorn the crowd, that if the throng By chance go right, they purposely go wrong.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Essay on Criticism, l. 426-7 (1711).
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Fondly we think we honour merit then, When we but praise ourselves in other men.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay on Criticism, l. 454-5 (1711).
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'Tis hard to say, if greater want of skill Appear in writing or in judging ill;
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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lf, presume not to God to scan; The proper study of Mankind is Man. Plac'd on this isthmus of a middle state, A being darkly wise, and rudely great.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay on Man, epistle 2.
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First follow Nature, and your judgment frame By her just standard, which is still the same; Unerring Nature, still divinely bright, One clear, unchanged, and universal light, Life, force, and beauty must to all impart, At once the source, and end, and test of art.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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