Alexander Pope Quotes

But all subsists by elemental strife; And Passions are the elements of Life.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Learn to live well, or fairly make your will; You've played, and loved, and eat, and drunk your fill: Walk sober off; before a sprightlier age Comes tittering on, and shoves you from the stage: Leave such to trifle with more grace and ease, Whom Folly pleases, and whose follies please.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Imitations of Horace, bk. 2, epistle 2, l. 322-7 (1737). Last lines of bk. 2, epistle 2.
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Scarfs, garters, gold, amuse his riper stage, And beads and prayer-books are the toys of age: Pleased with this bauble still, as that before; 'Till tired he sleeps, and life's poor play is o'er.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle II). SeCePo. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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The worst of madmen is a saint run mad.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Imitations of Horace, bk. 1, epistle 6, "To Mr. Murray," l. 27 (1738).
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Heav'n from all creatures, hides the book of Fate, All but the page prescrib'd, their present state:
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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There goes a saying, and 'twas shrewdly said, Old fish at table, but young flesh in bed.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Poetical Miscellanies (1709). January and May, l. 101-2. A translation of Chaucer The Merchant's Tale, written aged sixteen or seventeen.
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Fix'd like a plan on his peculiar spot, To draw nutrition, propagate, and rot.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay on Man, epistle 2, l. 63-4 (1733).
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Let sinful bachelors their woes deplore; Full well they merit all they feel, and more: Unaw'd by precepts, human or divine, Like birds and beasts, promiscuously they join.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. "January and May."
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An honest man's the noblest work of God.
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle IV). SeCePo. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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Who breaks a butterfly on a wheel?
Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Lord Hervey, in Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot, l. 308 (1735). The line has passed into common usage, and achieved notoriety in the 1960s when it was used to head the London Times leader July 1, 1967, on Mick Jagger and Keith Richard's arrest on drugs charges—an article which was thought to have contributed to their acquittal.
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