Allen Ginsberg Quotes

'Don't be afraid of me because I'm just coming back home from the mental hospital—I'm your mother—'
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Kaddish (l. 79). . . Allen Ginsberg: Collected Poems 1947-1980 (1984) Harper and Row.
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what can he do to escape that fatal Mama—
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Kaddish (l. 128). . . Allen Ginsberg: Collected Poems 1947-1980 (1984) Harper and Row.
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'I told him, Look at all those fightings and killings down there, What's the matter? Why don't you put a stop to it? 'I try, he said—That's all he could do, he looked tired. He's a bachelor so long, and he likes lentil soup.'
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Kaddish (l. 100-101). . . Allen Ginsberg: Collected Poems 1947-1980 (1984) Harper and Row.
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Fortunately art is a community effort—a small but select community living in a spiritualized world endeavoring to interpret the wars and the solitudes of the flesh.
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. "Mexico and Return to U.S.," entry for July 11, 1954, Journals: Early Fifties Early Sixties, ed. Gordon Ball (1977).
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Democracy! Bah! When I hear that word I reach for my feather Boa!
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. entry, Oct. 1960, "Subliminal." "New York City," Journals: Early Fifties Early Sixties, ed. Gordon Ball (1977).
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No monster vibration, no snake universe hallucinations. Many tiny jeweled violet flowers along the path of a living brook that looked like Blake's illustration for a canal in grassy Eden: huge Pacific watery shore, Orlovsky dancing naked like Shiva long-haired before giant green waves, titanic cliffs that Wordsworth mentioned in his own Sublime, great yellow sun veiled with mist hanging over the planet's oceanic horizon. No harm.
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Letter, June 2, 1966, describing an LSD experience in Big Sur, California. Paris Review (Flushing, NY, Summer 1966).
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I have a new method of poetry. All you got to do is look over your notebooks ... or lay down on a couch, and think of anything that comes into your head, especially the miseries.... Then arrange in lines of two, three or four words each, don't bother about sentences, in sections of two, three or four lines each.
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Letter, 1952, to Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady. Published in Barry Miles, Ginsberg: A Biography, ch. 5 (1989).
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Poetry is not an expression of the party line. It's that time of night, lying in bed, thinking what you really think, making the private world public, that's what the poet does.
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Quoted in Barry Miles, Ginsberg: A Biography, ch. 17 (1989).
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Nobody saves America by sniffing cocaine, Jiggling yr knees blankeyed in the rain, When it snows in yr nose you catch cold in yr brain.
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Quoted in Barry Miles, Ginsberg: A Biography, ch. 16 (1989).
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corolla of bleary spikes pushed down and broken like a battered crown, seeds fallen out of its face, soon-to-be- toothless mouth of sunny air, sunrays obliterated on its hairy head like a dried wire spiderweb,
Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926), U.S. poet. Sunflower Sutra (l. 8). . . Allen Ginsberg: Collected Poems 1947-1980 (1984) Harper and Row.
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