Ambrose Bierce Quotes

The covers of this book are too far apart.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. Quoted in C.H. Grattan, Bitter Bierce (1929). One-sentence book review.
A man is known by the company he organizes.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. "Saw," The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Bride. A woman with a fine prospect of happiness behind her.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Irreligion. The principal one of the great faiths of the world.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Insurrection. An unsuccessful revolution; disaffection's failure to substitute misrule for bad government.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Insurance. An ingenious modern game of chance in which the player is permitted to enjoy the comfortable conviction that he is beating the man who keeps the table.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Calamities are of two kinds: misfortune to ourselves, and good fortune to others.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).
Incompatibility. In matrimony a similarity of tastes, particularly the taste for domination.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Optimism. The doctrine or belief that everything is beautiful, including what is ugly.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906).
Conservative. A statesman who is enamored of existing evils, as distinguished from a Liberal, who wishes to replace them with others.
Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914), U.S. author. The Devil's Dictionary (1881-1906), repr. In Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, vol. 7 (1911).