Andrew Marvell Quotes

The grave's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. To His Coy Mistress, l. 31-2 (written c. 1650, published 1681).
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Had we but world enough, and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. To His Coy Mistress, l. 1-2 (written c. 1650, published 1681).
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Let us roll all our strength, and all Our sweetness, up into one ball: And tear our pleasures with rough strife, Thorough the iron gates of life. Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. To His Coy Mistress, l. 41-6 (written c. 1650, published 1681).
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But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity. Thy beauty shall no more be found, Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound My echoing song: then worms shall try That long preserved virginity: And your quaint honor turn to dust, And into ashes all my lust: The grave's a fine and private place, But none, I think, do there embrace.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. To His Coy Mistress (l. 21-32). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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And shew that Nature wants an Art To conquer one resolved Heart.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. A Dialogue between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure (l. 9-10). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Had I but any time to lose, On this I would it all dispose. Cease Tempter. None can chain a mind Whom this sweet Chordage cannot bind.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. A Dialogue between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure. . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Welcome the Creations Guest, Lord of Earth, and Heavens Heir. Lay aside that Warlike Crest, And of Nature's banquet share: Where the Souls of fruits and flow'rs Stand prepar'd to heighten yours.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. A Dialogue between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure (l. 11-16). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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But physic yet could never reach The maladies thou me dost teach: Whom first the cramp of hope does tear; And then the palsy shakes of fear; The pestilence of love does heat; Or hatred's hidden ulcer eat; Joy's cheerful madness does perplex, Or sorrow's other madness vex; Which knowledge forces me to know, And memory will not forgo. What but a soul could have the wit To build me up for sin so fit? So architects do square and hew Green trees that in the forest grew.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. A Dialogue between the Soul and Body (l. 31-44). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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O who shall from this dungeon raise A soul enslaved so many ways? With bolts of bones, that fettered stands In feet; and manacled in hands: Here blinded with an eye; and there Deaf with the drumming of an ear; A soul hung up, as 'twere, in chains Of nerves, and arteries, and veins;
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. A Dialogue between the Soul and Body (l. 1-8). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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The forward Youth that would appear Must now forsake his Muses dear, Nor in the Shadows sing His Numbers languishing.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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