Andrew Marvell Quotes

March indefatigably on, And for the last effect Still keep thy Sword erect: Besides the force it has to fright The Spirits of the shady Night; The same Arts that did gain A Pow'r must it maintain.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland (l. 57-60). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Though Justice against Fate complain, And plead the antient Rights in vain: But those do hold or break As Men are strong or weak.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland (l. 37-40). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Henothing common did, or mean, Upon the memorable Scene: But with his keener Eye The Axes edge did try:
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland (l. 57-60). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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He hangs in shades the orange bright, Like golden lamps in a green night, And does in the pomegranates close Jewels more rich than Ormus shows; He makes the figs our mouths to meet, And throws the melons at our feet; But apples plants of such a price No tree could ever bear them twice.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. Bermudas (l. 17-24). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Oh! let our voice His praise exalt, Till it arrive at Heaven's vault, Which, thence (perhaps) rebounding, may Echo beyond the Mexique bay."
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. Bermudas (l. 33-36). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Self-preservation, nature's first great law, All the creatures, except man, doth awe.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. "Hodge's Vision."
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So the soul, that drop, that ray Of the clear fountain of eternal day, Could it within the human flower be seen, Remembering still its former height, Shuns the sweet leaves and blossoms green; And, recollecting its own light, Does, in its pure and circling thoughts, express The greater heaven in an heaven less.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. On a Drop of Dew (l. 19-26). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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'Tis probable Religion after this Came next in order; which they could not miss. How could the Dutch but be converted, when The Apostles were so many fishermen? Besides the waters of themselves did rise, And, as their land, so them did re-baptize.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Character of Holland (l. 55-60). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Or shatter too with him my curious frame: And let these wither, so that he may die, Though set with Skill and chosen out with Care. That they, while Thou on both their Spoils dost tread, May crown thy Feet, that could not crown thy Head.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Coronet (l. 22-26). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Alas I find the Serpent old That, twining in his speckled breast, About the flow'rs disguis'd does fold, With wreaths of Fame and Interest.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Coronet (l. 13-16). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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