Andrew Marvell Quotes

My love is of a birth as rare As 'tis for object strange and high: It was begotten by Despair Upon Impossibility.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. The Definition of Love (written c. 1650, published 1681).
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Therefore the love which us doth bind, But fate so enviously debars, Is the conjunction of the mind, And opposition of the stars.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Definition of Love (l. 29-32). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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It was begotten by despair Upon impossibility.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Definition of Love (l. 3-4). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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To make a final conquest of all me, Love did compose so sweet an enemy, In whom both beauties to my death agree, Joining themselves in fatal harmony; That while she with her eyes my heart does bind, She with her voice might captivate my mind.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Fair Singer (l. 1-6). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Here thou art painted in the dress Of an inhuman murderess; Examining upon our hearts Thy fertile shop of cruel arts: Engines more keen than ever yet Adorned tyrant's cabinet, Of which the most tormenting are Black eyes, red lips, and curled hair.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Gallery (l. 9-16). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Like an enchantress here thou show'st, Vexing thy restless lover's ghost; And, by a light obscure, dost rave Over his entrails, in the cave; Divining thence, with horrid care, How long thou shalt continue fair; And (when informed) them throw'st away, To be the greedy vulture's prey.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Gallery (l. 25-32). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Annihilating all that's made To a green thought in a green shade.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. The Garden, st. 6 (written c. 1650, published 1681).
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Meanwhile the mind from pleasure less Withdraws into its happiness; The mind, that ocean where each kind Does straight its own resemblance find; Yet it creates, transcending these, Far other worlds and other seas, Annihilating all that's made To a green thought in a green shade,
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Garden (l. 41-48). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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What wondrous life in this I lead! Ripe apples drop about my head; The luscious clusters of the vine Upon my mouth do crush their wine; The nectarine and curious peach Into my hands themselves do reach; Stumbling on melons, as I pass, Ensnared with flowers, I fall on grass.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Garden (l. 33-40). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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Society is all but rude, To this delicious solitude. No white nor red was ever seen So amorous as this lovely green. Fond lovers, cruel as their flame, Cut in these trees their mistress' name: Little, alas, they know or heed How far these beauties hers exceed! Fair trees, wheresoe'er your barks I wound, No name shall but your own be found.
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Garden (l. 15-23). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
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