Benjamin Franklin King Quotes

No nation was ever ruined by trade.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Thoughts on Commercial Subjects.
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I think that a young state, like a young virgin, should modestly stay at home, and wait the application of suitors for an alliance with her; and not run about offering her amity to all the world; and hazarding their refusal.... Our virgin is a jolly one; and tho at present not very rich, will in time be a great fortune, and where she has a favorable predisposition, it seems to me well worth cultivating.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Letter, September 22, 1778.
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Ça ira. (It will go its own way.)
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Attributed. Said about the American Revolution while Franklin was in Paris 1776-1777. The remark was popularized and made the refrain of a revolutionary song—the Carillon National—by Ladré during the French Revolution of 1789.
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If you teach a poor young man to shave himself, and keep his razor in order, you may contribute more to the happiness of his life than in giving him a thousand guineas. This sum may be soon spent, the regret only remaining of having foolishly consumed it; but in the other case, he escapes the frequent vexation of waiting for barbers, and of their sometimes dirty fingers, offensive breaths, and dull razors.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 8 (written 1771-1790, published 1868).
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Most people dislike vanity in others, whatever share they have of it themselves; but I give it fair quarter, wherever I meet with it, being persuaded that it is often productive of good to the possessor, and to others who are within his sphere of action: and therefore, in many cases, it would not be altogether absurd if a man were to thank God for his vanity among the other comforts of life.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 1 (1868).
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That which resembles most living one's life over again, seems to be to recall all the circumstances of it; and, to render this remembrance more durable, to record them in writing.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 1 (1868).
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Those disputing, contradicting, and confuting people are generally unfortunate in their affairs. They get victory, sometimes, but they never get good will, which would be of more use to them.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 9 (1868). Written 1771-1790. Earlier in his autobiography (ch. 1), describing his own "disputatious turn" when younger, a habit he had picked up from reading his father's books, Franklin observed, "Persons of good sense ... seldom fall into it, except lawyers, university men, and, generally, men of all sorts who have been bred at Edinburgh."
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A benevolent man should allow a few faults in himself, to keep his friends in countenance.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 6 (written 1771-1790, publ. 1868).
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I should have no objection to go over the same life from its beginning to the end: requesting only the advantage authors have, of correcting in a second edition the faults of the first.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 1 (1868).
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Those who govern, having much business on their hands, do not generally like to take the trouble of considering and carrying into execution new projects. The best public measures are therefore seldom adopted from previous wisdom, but forced by the occasion.
Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), U.S. statesman, writer. Autobiography, ch. 9 (written 1771-1790, publ. 1868).
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