Charles Baudelaire Quotes

I can barely conceive of a type of beauty in which there is no Melancholy.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, X (1887).
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Love is a taste for prostitution. In fact, there is no noble pleasure that cannot be reduced to Prostitution.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, I (1887).
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In certain almost supernatural states of the soul, the profundity of life reveals itself entirely in the spectacle, however ordinary it may be, before one's eyes. It becomes its symbol.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, XI (1887).
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It is at the same time by poetry and through poetry, by and through music, that the soul glimpses the splendors found behind the tomb; and when an exquisite poem brings tears to one's eyes, these tears are not the sign of excessive pleasure, they are rather witness to an irritated melancholy, to a condition of nerves, to a nature exiled to imperfection and which would like to seize immediately, on this very earth, a revealed paradise.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part IV (1859).
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Imagination is an almost divine faculty which, without recourse to any philosophical method, immediately perceives everything: the secret and intimate connections between things, correspondences and analogies.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part III (1859).
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Progress, this great heresy of decay.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part II (1859).
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It is this admirable and immortal instinct for beauty which causes us to regard the earth and its spectacles as a glimpse, a correspondence of the beyond.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part IV (1859).
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If the poet has pursued a moral objective, he has diminished his poetic force.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part IV (1859).
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We are all born marked for evil.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part II (1859).
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The insatiable thirst for everything which lies beyond, and which life reveals, is the most living proof of our immortality.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. New Notes on E. Poe, part IV (1859).
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