Charles Baudelaire Quotes

Whether you come from heaven or hell, what does it matter, O Beauty!
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French. Flowers of Evil, "Hymn to Beauty," (1860).
(28) (12)
There is no more steely barb than that of the Infinite.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. Complete Works, vol. 1, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Gérard le Dantec; rev. Claude Pichois (1953). The Artist "Confiteor," La Presse (Paris, Aug. 26, 1862).
(6) (2)
Alas! everything is an abyss,—action, dream, desire, speech!
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "The Abyss," (1862).
(8) (4)
There exist certain individuals who are, by nature, given purely to contemplation and are utterly unsuited to action, and who, nevertheless, under a mysterious and unknown impulse, sometimes act with a speed which they themselves would have thought beyond them.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 1, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Yves-Gérard le Dantec, revised by Claude Pichois (1953). "The Bad Glazier," La Presse (Paris, Aug. 26, 1862).
(7) (2)
I lived for a long time under vast porticos That maritime suns tinted with a thousand fires, And whose great pillars, straight and majestuous In the evening made seem like basaltic caves.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "A Former Life," (1857).
(2) (1)
I have to confess that I had gambled on my soul and lost it with heroic insouciance and lightness of touch. The soul is so impalpable, so often useless, and sometimes such a nuisance, that I felt no more emotion on losing it than if, on a stroll, I had mislaid my visiting card.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 4, "Shorter Prose Poems," ed. Yves-Gérard le Dantec; rev. Claude Pichois (1953). "The Generous Gambler," in Figaro (Paris, Feb. 7, 1864).
(5) (4)
There, there is only order and beauty, Luxury, quietness, and pleasure.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "Invitation to the Voyage," (1855).
(3) (2)
The lover of life makes the whole world into his family, just as the lover of the fair sex creates his from all the lovely women he has found, from those that could be found, and those who are impossible to find.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern life," sect. 3, L'Art Romantique (1869).
(4) (1)
We want ... to plunge into the depths of the abyss, Hell or Heaven, what does it matter? into the depths of the Unknown to find something new!
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "The Voyage," (1859).
(10) (5)
Who would dare assign to art the sterile function of imitating nature?
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, XI "In Praise of Cosmetics," (1863).
(7) (2)