Charles Baudelaire Quotes

Everything for me becomes allegory.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "The Swan," (1860).
Are you not the oasis where I dream, and the gourd from which I drink in long draughts the wine of memory?
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "Her Hair," (1859).
Genius is no more than childhood recaptured at will, childhood equipped now with man's physical means to express itself, and with the analytical mind that enables it to bring order into the sum of experience, involuntarily amassed.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sct. 3, L'Art Romantique (1869).
I am a cemetery abhorred by the moon.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Flowers of Evil, "Spleen II," (1857).
Even in the centuries which appear to us to be the most monstrous and foolish, the immortal appetite for beauty has always found satisfaction.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, I "Beauty, Fashion, and Happiness," (1863).
The pleasure we derive from the representation of the present is due, not only to the beauty it can be clothed in, but also to its essential quality of being the present.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sect. 1, published in L'Art Romantique (1869).
It is the pleasure of astonishing others, and the proud satisfaction of never being astonished by them.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, IX "The Dandy," (1863). On dandyism.
The dance can reveal everything mysterious that is hidden in music, and it has the additional merit of being human and palpable. Dancing is poetry with arms and legs.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. La Fanfarlo (1847), trans. 1986.
These beings have no other profession than to cultivate the idea of beauty in their person, to satisfy their passions, to feel and to think.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, IX "The Dandy," (1863). On the dandy.
A frenzied passion for art is a canker that devours everything else.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Complete Works, vol. 2, ed. Yves-Gérard le Dantec, rev. by Claude Pichois (1976). L'Ecole Païenne (1852).