Charles Baudelaire Quotes

Hypocrite reader—my fellow—my brother!
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. Les Fleurs du Mal, preface (1857).
(5) (4)
Nature ... is nothing but the inner voice of self-interest.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sct. 11, L'Art Romantique (1869).
(4) (3)
Multitude, solitude: equal and interchangeable terms for the active and prolific poet.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "Crowds," (1861).
(1) (3)
All which is beautiful and noble is the result of reason and calculation.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, XI "In Praise of Cosmetics," (1863).
(7) (3)
My soul travels on the smell of perfume like the souls of other men on music.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "A Hemisphere in a Head of Hair," (1857).
(5) (3)
The idea which man forms of beauty imprints itself throughout his attire, rumples or stiffens his garments, rounds off or aligns his gestures, and, finally, even subtly penetrates the features of his face.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, I "Beauty, Fashion, and Happiness," (1863).
(2) (2)
The study of beauty is a duel in which the artist cries with terror before being defeated.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "The Confiteor of the Artist," (1862).
(3) (4)
"Modernity" signifies the transitory, the fugitive, the contingent, the half of art of which the other half is the eternal and the immutable.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, IV "Modernity," (1863).
(6) (4)
This life is a hospital in which each patient is obsessed with the desire to change beds.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. Little Poems in Prose (Paris Spleen), "Anywhere Out of the World," (1867).
(7) (3)
Love is the natural occupation of the man of leisure.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, IX "The Dandy," (1863).
(3) (4)