Charles Baudelaire Quotes

The priest is an immense being because he makes the crowd believe astonishing things.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, II (1887).
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The being who, for most men, is the source of the most lively, and even, be it said, to the shame of philosophical delights, the most lasting joys; the being towards or for whom all their efforts tend ... for whom and by whom fortunes are made and lost; for whom, but especially by whom, artists and poets compose their most delicate jewels; from whom flow the most enervating pleasures and the most enriching sufferings—woman, in a word, is not, for the artist in general ... only the female of the human species. She is rather a divinity, a star.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1667), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sct. 10, L'Art Romantique (1869).
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Let us beware of common folk, of common sense, of sentiment, of inspiration, and of the obvious.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, XLI (1887).
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Evil is done without effort, naturally, it is the working of fate; good is always the product of an art.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sect. 11, published in L'Art Romantique (1869).
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I have cultivated my hysteria with pleasure and terror.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. "My Heart Laid Bare," (written c. 1865), published in Intimate Journals, sct. 109 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. by Don Bachardy (1989).
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Evil is committed without effort, naturally, fatally; goodness is always the product of some art.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, XI "In Praise of Cosmetics," (1863).
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We are weighed down, every moment, by the conception and the sensation of Time. And there are but two means of escaping and forgetting this nightmare: pleasure and work. Pleasure consumes us. Work strengthens us. Let us choose.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. My Heart Laid Bare (written c. 1865), published in Intimate Journals, sct. 111 (1887), trans. by Christopher Isherwood (1930), rev. by Don Bachardy (1989).
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But a dandy can never be a vulgar man.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. The Painter of Modern Life, IX "The Dandy," (1863).
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As a small child, I felt in my heart two contradictory feelings, the horror of life and the ecstasy of life.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic. My Heart Laid Bare, LV (1887).
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Nearly all our originality comes from the stamp that time impresses upon our sensibility.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet. repr. In Selected Writings on Art and Artists, ed. P.E. Charvet (1972). "The Painter of Modern Life," sct. 4, L'Art Romantique (1869).
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