Charles Stuart Calverley Quotes

'Tis not that thy mien is stately, 'Tis not that thy tones are soft;
Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 93-94). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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Grinder, who serenely grindest At my door the Hundredth Psalm,
Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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Tell me, Grinder, if thou grindest Always, always out of tune.
Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 19-20). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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But I've heard mankind abuse thee; And perhaps it's rather strange, But I thought that I would choose thee For encomium, as a change.
Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. Lines on Hearing the Organ (l. 97-100). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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Go mad, and beat their wives; Plunge (after shocking lives) Razors and carving knives Into their gizzards.
Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. "Ode to Tobacco." This is possibly a reference to a letter in the medical journal Lancet, Feb. 14, 1857: "[Dr. Webster] distinctly enumerates tobacco as one of the causes of insanity.... Two brothers in one family had become deranged from smoking tobacco, and in that state had committed suicide."
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Her sheep follow'd her, as their tails did them. (Butter and eggs and a pound of cheese) And this song is consider'd a perfect gem, And as to the meaning, it's what you please.
Charles Stuart Calverley (1831-1884), British poet. The auld wife sat at her ivied door (l. 37-40). . . Norton Book of Light Verse, The. Russell Baker, ed. (1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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