Christopher Marlowe Quotes

On Hellespont guiltie of True-loves blood, In view and opposit two citties stood, Seaborders, disjoin'd by Neptunes might: The one Abydos, the other Sestos hight.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 1-4). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Where both deliberate, the love is slight: Who ever loved, that loved not at first sight?
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Hero and Leander, "First Sestiad" l. 175-6 (1598). The words are recalled in Shakespeare's As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 175-6, which appeared a year after Marlowe's poem: "Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might: 'Who ever loved that loved not at first sight?'..."
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It lies not in our power to love, or hate, For will in us is over-rul'd by fate.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 167-168). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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One is no number, mayds are nothing then, Without the sweet societie of men. Wilt thou live single still? one shalt thou bee, Though never-singling Hymen couple thee.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 255-258). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Love is not ful of pittie (as men say) But deaffe and cruell, where he meanes to pray.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (II, l. 287-288). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Amorous Leander, beautifull and yoong, (Whose tragedie divine Musaeus soong) Dwelt at Abidus,
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 51-53). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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This idoll which you terme Virginitie, Is neither essence subject to the eie, No, nor to any one exterior sence, Nor hath it any place of residence, Nor is't of earth or mold celestiall, Or capable of any forme at all.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 269-279). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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And one especiallie doe we affect, Of two gold Ingots like in each respect, The reason no man knowes, let it suffise, What we behold is censur'd by our eies. Where both deliberat, the love is slight, Who ever lov'd, that lov'd not at first sight?
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 171-178). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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O none but gods have power their love to hide, Affection by the count'nance is descride. The light of hidden fire it selfe discovers, And love that is conceal'd, betraies poore lovers.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (II, l. 130-133). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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The men of wealthie Sestos, everie yeare, (For his sake whom their goddesse held so deare, Rose-cheekt Adonis) kept a solemne feast, Thither resorted many a wandring guest, To meet their loves;
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 91-95). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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