Christopher Marlowe Quotes

Like to the tree of Tantalus she fled, And seeming lavish, sav'de her maydenhead. Ne're king more sought to keepe his diademe; Than Hero this inestimable gemme.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (II, l. 75-78). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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He askt, she gave, and nothing was denied, Both to each other quickly were affied. Looke how their hands, so were their hearts united, And what he did, she willingly requited. (Sweet are the kisses, the imbracements sweet, When like desires and affections meet),
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (II, l. 25-30). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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All women are ambitious naturallie,
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 428). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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I count religion but a childish toy, And hold there is no sin but innocence.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Machiavel, in "Prologue," The Jew of Malta. The lines are often modernized: I count religion but a childish toy, And hold there is no sin but ignorance.
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I count religion but a childish toy, And hold there is no sin but ignorance.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Machiavel, in The Jew of Malta, "Prologue," (writen c. 1589, first published 1633). The second line sometimes appears, "no sin but innocence."
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Hell hath no limits, nor is circumscrib'd In one self place; for where we are is Hell, And where Hell is, there must we ever be.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Mephistopheles, in The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus, act 2, sc. 1, l. 121-3 (1604).
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Accurst be he that first invented war.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Mycetes, King of Persia, in Tamburlaine the Great, pt. 1, act 2, sc. 4 (1590).
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My men, like satyrs grazing on the lawns, Shall with their goat feet dance an antic hay.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Piers Gaveston, in Edward II, act 1, sc. 1 (1593). "Antic hay" refers to a playful dance.
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The ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Tamburlaine, in Tamburlaine the Great, pt. 1, act 2, sc. 7, l. 28-9 (1590).
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That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Tamburlaine, in Tamburlaine the Great, pt. 1, act 2, sc. 7.
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