Claude McKay Quotes

The shivering birds beneath the eaves Have sheltered for the night.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. After the Winter (l. 3-4). . . Poetry of Black America, The; Anthology of the 20th Century. Arnold Adoff, ed. (1973) Harper & Row.
(180) (67)
Although she feeds me bread of bitterness, And sinks into my throat her tiger's tooth, Stealing my breath of life, I will confess I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. America (l. 1-4). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(180) (59)
I have forgotten much, but still remember The poinsettia's red, blood-red in warm December.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. Flame-Heart (l. 9-10). . . Caroling Dusk; an Anthology of Verse by Negro Poets. Countee Cullen, ed. (1927) Harper & Brothers.
(187) (61)
Oh some I know! I have embalmed the days, Even the sacred moments when we played, All innocent of passion, uncorrupt, At noon and evening in the flame-heart's shade.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican. Flame-Heart (l. 26-29). . . Caroling Dusk; an Anthology of Verse by Negro Poets. Countee Cullen, ed. (1927) Harper & Brothers.
(134) (53)
Like men we'll face the murderous, cowardly pack, Pressed to the wall, dying, but fighting back!
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. If We Must Die (l. 13-14). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(47) (6)
If we must die, O let us nobly die, So that our precious blood may not be shed In vain; then even the monsters we defy Shall be constrained to honor us though dead!
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. If We Must Die (l. 5-8). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(32) (5)
The wine-flushed, bold-eyed boys, and even the girls, Devoured her with their eager, passionate gaze; But looking at her falsely-smiling face, I knew her self was not in that strange place.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. The Harlem Dancer (l. 11-14). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(30) (3)
And, hungry for the old, familiar ways, I turned aside and bowed my head and wept.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. The Tropics in New York (l. 11-12). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(24) (5)
Deep in the secret chambers of my heart I muse my life-long hate, and without flinch I bear it nobly as I live my part.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. The White City (l. 2-4). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(24) (5)
The pavement slabs burn loose beneath my feet, A chafing savage, down the decent street; And passion rends my vitals as I pass, Where boldly shines your shuttered door of glass.
Claude McKay (1889-1948), U.S.-Jamaican poet. The White House (l. 5-8). . . Norton Introduction to Poetry, The. J. Paul Hunter, ed. (3d ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
(22) (7)