Dorothy Parker Quotes

Drink, and dance and laugh and lie, Love the reeling midnight through, For tomorrow we shall die! (But, alas, we never do.)
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. writer, wit. The Flaw in Paganism.
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Then if my friendships break and bend, There's little need to cry The while I know that every foe Is faithful till I die.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. The Heel.
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Where's the man could ease a heart Like a satin gown?
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. The Satin Dress, st. 1, Enough Rope (1926).
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If, with the literate, I am Impelled to try an epigram, I never seek to take the credit; We all assume that Oscar said it.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. humorous writer. A Pig's-Eye View of Literature, Sunset Gun (1928).
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I do wish that as long as they are translating the thing, they would go right on ahead, while they're at it, and translate Fedor Vasilyevich Protosov and Georgei Dmitrievich Abreskov and Ivan Petrovich Alexandrov into Joe and Harry and Fred.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 9, by Leslie Frewin (1986). On the long names characteristic of Russia and common in Russian literature.
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This play holds the season's record [for early closing], thus far, with a run of four evening performances and one matinee. By an odd coincidence it ran just five performances too many.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 10, by Leslie Frewin (1986). In a review, written for Vanity Fair magazine, of a bad play.
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Wit has truth in it ... wisecracking is simply calisthenics with words.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 9, by Leslie Frewin (1986). Parker was reputed to be the wittiest woman of her time.
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The affair between Margot Asquith and Margot Asquith will live as one of the prettiest love stories in all literature.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 28, by Leslie Frewin (1986). In a review, probably written in the early 1920s, of the autobiography of Margot Asquith (1864-1945).
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The two most beautiful words in the English language are "check enclosed."
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 17, by Leslie Frewin (1986). Said in the 1920s; Parker, trying to earn her living as a writer, was referring to the financial insecurity of the profession.
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Money is only congealed snow.
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), U.S. author and humorist. As quoted in The Late Mrs. Dorothy Parker, ch. 25, by Leslie Frewin (1986). A popular writer who had earned considerable sums of money, Parker spent carelessly and always seemed to be in need.
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