Edmund Spenser Quotes

So forth those joyous Birdes did passe along, Adowne the Lee, that to them murmurde low, As he would speake, but that he lackt a tong,
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 114-116). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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The snow, which doth the top of Pindus strew, Did never whiter shew, Nor Jove himself, when he a swan would be For love of Leda, whiter did appear:
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 40-43). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song.
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 18). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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Walked forth to ease my pain Along the shore of silver streaming Thames, Whose rutty bank, the which his river hems, Was painted all with variable flowers,
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 10-13). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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At length they all to merry London came, To merry London, my most kindly nurse, That to me gave this life's first native source; Though from another place I take my name, An house of ancient fame.
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 127-131). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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Joy may you have and gentle hearts content Of your loves couplement: And let faire Venus, that is Queene of love, With her heart-quelling Sonne upon you smile,
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 94-97). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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Sweete Themmes! runne softly, till I end my Song.
Edmund Spenser (c. 1522-1599), British poet. Prothalamion. The line recurred in T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land.
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Yet therein now doth lodge a noble peer, Great England's glory and the world's wide wonder, Whose dreadful name late through all Spain did thunder,
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Prothalamion (l. 145-147). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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Gather therefore the Rose, whilest yet is prime, For soone comes age, that will her pride deflowre: Gather the Rose of love, whilest yet is time, Whilest loving thou mayst loved be with equall crime.'
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. The Faerie Queene (l. 16-18). PoEL-1. The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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'So passeth, in the passing of a day, Of mortall life the leafe, the bud, the flowre,
Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. The Faerie Queene. . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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