Edward Morgan Forster Quotes

Men fall into two classes—those who forget views and those who remember them.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. I, ch. 15 (1908). George Emerson's opinion repeated by Lucy Honeychurch.
Tolerance is a very dull virtue. It is boring. Unlike love, it has always had a bad press. It is negative. It merely means putting up with people, being able to stand things.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Two Cheers for Democracy, "Tolerance," (1951). The essay, written in 1941, looked ahead to the post-war world, and the necessity to accept former enemies. "I don't ... regard tolerance as a great eternally established divine principle ..." Forster wrote. "It is just a makeshift, suitable for an overcrowded and overheated planet.... It's dull. And yet it entails imagination."
We cast a shadow on something wherever we stand.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. II, ch. 15 (1908). George Emerson's view.
I hate the idea of causes, and if I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend, I hope I should have the guts to betray my country.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. Two Cheers for Democracy, "What I Believe," (1951).
She loved Cecil; George made her nervous; will the reader explain to her that the phrases should have been reversed?
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. II, ch. 14 (1908).
Why does the soul always require a machine-gun?
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "What Has Germany Done to the Germans?" pt. I (1940), in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951). Originally part of an anti-Nazi radio broadcast.
He remained in the grip of a certain devil whom the modern world knows as self-consciousness, and whom the mediaeval, with dimmer vision, worshipped as asceticism.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. A Room with a View, pt. II, ch. 8 (1908). Concerning Cecil Vyse.
So, two cheers for Democracy: one because it admits variety and two because it permits criticism.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "What I Believe," pt. II (1939), in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951).
Without form, the sensitiveness vanishes.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "Art for Art's Sake," pt. II (1949), in Two Cheers for Democracy (1951). Originally an address delivered at the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
The more highly public life is organized the lower does its morality sink.
E.M. (Edward Morgan) Forster (1879-1970), British novelist, essayist. "What I Believe," Two Cheers for Democracy (1951).