Elizabeth Barrett Browning Quotes

Let no one till his death Be called unhappy. Measure not the work Until the day's out and the labour done.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 5, l. 76-8 (1857). See Solon on "happiness."
(6) (1)
How many desolate creatures on the earth Have learnt the simple dues of fellowship And social comfort, in a hospital.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 3 (1857).
(6) (1)
For 'tis not in mere death that men die most.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 3, l. 12 (1857).
(6) (1)
We all have known Good critics, who have stamped out poet's hopes; Good statesmen, who pulled ruin on the state; Good patriots, who, for a theory, risked a cause; Good kings, who disembowelled for a tax; Good Popes, who brought all good to jeopardy; Good Christians, who sat still in easy-chairs; And damned the general world for standing up.— Now, may the good God pardon all good men!
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 4 (1857).
(7) (2)
Yet how proud we are, In daring to look down upon ourselves!
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 5 (1857).
(3) (1)
A woman's always younger than a man At equal years.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 2 (1857). An explanation follows: ... because she is disallowed Maturing by the outdoor sun and air, And kept in long-clothes past the age to walk.
(7) (1)
The works of women are symbolical. We sew, sew, prick our fingers, dull our sight, Producing what? A pair of slippers, sir, To put on when you're weary or a stool To stumble over and vex you ... "curse that stool!" Or else at best, a cushion, where you lean And sleep, and dream of something we are not, But would be for your sake. Alas, alas! This hurts most, this ... that, after all, we are paid The worth of our work, perhaps.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 1, l. 456 (1857).
(6) (1)
A woman cannot do the thing she ought, Which means whatever perfect thing she can, In life, in art, in science, but she fears To let the perfect action take her part And rest there: she must prove what she can do Before she does it,—prate of woman's rights, Of woman's mission, woman's function, till The men (who are prating, too, on their side) cry, "A woman's function plainly is ... to talk." Poor souls, they are very reasonably vexed!
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 8 (1857).
(8) (2)
Girls blush, sometimes, because they are alive, Half wishing they were dead to save the shame. The sudden blush devours them, neck and brow; They have drawn too near the fire of life, like gnats, And flare up bodily, wings and all. What then? Who's sorry for a gnat ... or girl?
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 2 (1857).
(6) (4)
And trade is art, and art's philosophy, In Paris.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806-1861), British poet. Aurora Leigh, bk. 6, l. 96 (1857).
(5) (1)