Emily Dickinson Quotes

The Heart asks Pleasure—first— And then—Excuse from Pain—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. The Heart asks Pleasure—first (l. 1-2). CP-Di. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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I know some lonely houses off the road A robber'd like the look of,— Wooden barred, And windows hanging low,
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. I know some lonely houses off the road (l. 1-4). CP-Di. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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The last Night that She lived It was a Common Night Except the Dying—this to Us Made Nature different
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. The last Night that She lived (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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While the old couple, just astir, Fancy the sunrise left the door ajar!
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. I know some lonely houses off the road (l. 39-40). CP-Di. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Too jostled were Our Souls to speak At length the notice came.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. The last Night that She lived (l. 19-20). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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I like a look of Agony, Because I know it's true—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. I like a look of Agony (l. 1-2). CP-Di. Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
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struggled scarce— Consented, and was dead— And We—We placed the Hair— And drew the Head erect— And then an awful leisure was Belief to regulate—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. The last Night that She lived (l. 23-28). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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I like to see it lap the Miles— And lick the Valleys up—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. I like to see it lap the Miles (l. 1-2). CP-DI. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Will you tell me my fault, frankly as to yourself, for I had rather wince, than die. Men do not call the surgeon to commend the bone, but to set it, Sir.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Letter, July 1862, to clergyman and writer T.W. Higginson. The Letters of Emily Dickinson, vol. 2 (1958).
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And neigh like Boanerges— Then—punctual as a Star Stop—docile and omnipotent At its own stable door—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. I like to see it lap the Miles (l. 14-17). CP-Di. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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