Emily Dickinson Quotes

After great pain, a formal feeling comes— The Nerves sit ceremonious, like Tombs—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. repr. in The Complete Poems, no. 341, Harvard variorum edition (1955). After Great Pain, a Formal Feeling Comes (written c. 1862, published 1929).
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Just girt me for the onset with Eternity, When breath blew back, And on the other side I heard recede the disappointed tide!
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Just lost, when I was saved! (L. 3-6). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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When God—remembered—and the Fiend Let go, then, Overcome—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. 'Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch (l. 16-17). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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This is the Hour of Lead— Remembered, if outlived, As Freezing persons, recollect the Snow— First—Chill—then Stupor—then the letting go—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. After great pain, a formal feeling comes (l. 10-13). CP-Di. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Next time, to tarry, While the Ages steal— Slow tramp the Centuries, And the Cycles wheel!
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Just lost, when I was saved! (L. 16-19). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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And you dropt, lost, When something broke— And let you from a Dream—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. 'Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch (l. 7-9). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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A light exists in spring Not present on the year At any other period.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. A light exists in spring (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Much madness is divinest sense To a discerning eye; Much sense the starkest madness.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Much madness is divinest sense (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Which Anguish was the utterest—then— To perish, or to live?
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. 'Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch (l. 24-25). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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It passes, and we stay: A quality of loss Affecting our content, As trade had suddenly encroached Upon a sacrament.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. A light exists in spring (l. 16-20). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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