Emily Dickinson Quotes

Much Madness is divinest Sense— To a discerning Eye— Much Sense—the starkest Madness—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Much Madness is Divinest Sense (written c. 1862, published 1890). repr. in The Complete Poems, no. 435, Harvard variorum edition (1955).
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Twas warm—at first—like Us— Until there crept upon A Chill—like frost upon a Glass—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. 'Twas warm—at first—like Us (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Ample make this bed. Make this bed with awe; In it wait till judgment break Excellent and fair.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Ample make this bed (l. 1-4). CP-Di. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Assent, and you are sane; Demur,—you're straightway dangerous, And handled with a chain.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Much madness is divinest sense (l. 6-8). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Victory comes late— And is held low to freezing lips— Too rapt with frost To take it—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. "Victory comes late": Poem #690 in her Complete Poems, lines 1-4 (c. 1863).
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A narrow Fellow in the Grass Occasionally rides—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. A narrow Fellow in the Grass (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Assent—and you are sane— Demur—you're straightway dangerous— And handled with a Chain—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. repr. in The Complete Poems, no. 435, Harvard variorum edition (1955). Much Madness is Divinest Sense (written c. 1862, published 1890).
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Redemption, brittle lady, Be so ashamed of thee.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. What soft, cherubic creatures (l. 11-12). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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But never met this Fellow Attended, or alone Without a tighter breathing And Zero at the Bone—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. A narrow Fellow in the Grass (l. 21-24). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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My life closed twice before its close—
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. My life closed twice before its close (l. 1). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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