Emily Dickinson Quotes

God preaches,—a noted clergyman,— And the sermon is never long; So instead of getting to heaven at last, I'm going all along!
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Some keep the Sabbath going to church (l. 9-12). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Fame is a bee. It has a song-- It has a sting-- Ah, too, it has a wing.
Emily Dickinson (1831-1886), U.S. poet. "Fame is a bee": poem no. 1763 in her Collected Poems, entire poem (date not known).
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Some keep the Sabbath going to church; I keep it staying at home,
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Some keep the Sabbath going to church (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Fame is a fickle food Upon a shifting plate.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. repr. in The Complete Poems, no. 1659, Harvard variorum edition (1955). Fame is a Fickle Food (published 1914).
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Spring is the Period Express from God.
Emily Dickinson (1831-1886), U.S. poet. "Spring is the Period": poem no. 844 in her Collected Poems, lines 1-2 (c. 1864).
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Farther in summer than the birds, Pathetic from the grass, A minor nation celebrates Its unobtrusive Mass.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Farther in summer than the birds (l. 1-4). CP-Di. Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
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Success is counted sweetest By those who ne'er succeed.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Success is counted sweetest (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Thomas H. Johnson, ed. (1960) Little, Brown.
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Remit as yet no grace, No furrow on the glow, Yet a druidic difference Enhances nature now.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. Farther in summer than the birds (l. 13-16). PoEL-2. Poets of the English Language, Vols. I-V. Vol. I: Langland to Spenser; Vol. II: Marlowe to Marvell; Vol. III: Milton to Goldsmith; Vol. IV: Blake to Poe; Vol. V: Tennyson to Yeats. W. H. Auden and Norman Holmes Pearson, eds. (1950) The Viking Press.
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Success is counted sweetest By those who ne'er succeed. To comprehend a nectar Requires sorest need.
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. repr. in The Complete Poems, no. 67, Harvard variorum edition (1955). Success Is Counted Sweetest, st. 1 (written c. 1859, published 1878).
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His Labor is a Chant— His Idleness—a Tune— Oh, for a Bee's experience Of Clovers, and of Noon!
Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), U.S. poet. repr. in The Complete Poems, no. 916, Harvard variorum edition (1955). His Feet Are Shod With Gauze, st. 2 (written c. 1864, published 1890).
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