Erica Jong Quotes

Perhaps all artists were, in a sense, housewives: tenders of the earth household.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. "The Artist as Housewife," The First Ms Reader, ed. Francine Kragbrun (1972).
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If sex and creativity are often seen by dictators as subversive activities, it's because they lead to the knowledge that you own your own body (and with it your own voice), and that's the most revolutionary insight of all.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. "The Artist as Housewife," The First Ms. Reader, ed. Francine Kragbrun (1972).
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Men and women, women and men. It will never work.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. The narrator (Isadora Wing), in Fear of Flying, ch. 16 (1973).
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Back in the days when men were hunters and chestbeaters and women spent their whole lives worrying about pregnancy or dying in childbirth, they often had to be taken against their will. Men complained that women were cold, unresponsive, frigid.... They wanted their women wanton. They wanted their women wild. Now women were finally learning to be wanton and wild—and what happened? The men wilted.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. The narrator (Isadora Wing), in Fear of Flying, ch. 16 (1973).
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Men have always detested women's gossip because they suspect the truth: their measurements are being taken and compared.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. The narrator (Isadora Wing), in Fear of Flying, ch. 6 (1973).
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A man assumes that a woman's refusal is just part of a game. Or, at any rate, a lot of men assume that. When a man says no, it's no. When a woman says no, it's yes, or at least maybe. There is even a joke to that effect. And little by little, women begin to believe in this view of themselves.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. The narrator (Isadora Wing), in Fear of Flying, ch. 16 (1973).
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Growing up female in America. What a liability! You grew up with your ears full of cosmetic ads, love songs, advice columns, whoreoscopes, Hollywood gossip, and moral dilemmas on the level of TV soap operas. What litanies the advertisers of the good life chanted at you! What curious catechisms!
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. The narrator (Isadora Wing), in Fear of Flying, ch. 1 (1873).
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Gossip is the opiate of the oppressed.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. The narrator (Isadora Wing), in Fear of Flying, ch. 6 (1973).
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There is a rhythm to the ending of a marriage just like the rhythm of a courtship—only backward. You try to start again but get into blaming over and over. Finally you are both worn out, exhausted, hopeless. Then lawyers are called in to pick clean the corpses. The death has occurred much earlier.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. "There Is a Rhythm to the Ending ... ," How to Save Your Own Life (1977).
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Oh Doris Lessing, my dear—your Anna is wrong about orgasms. They are no proof of love—any more than that other Anna's fall under the wheels of that Russian train was a proof of love. It's all female shenanigans, cultural mishegoss, conditioning, brainwashing, male mythologizing. What does a woman want? She wants what she has been told she ought to want. Anna Wulf wants orgasm, Anna Karenina, death. Orgasm is no proof of anything. Orgasm is proof of orgasm. Someday every woman will have orgasms—like every family has color TV—and we can all get on with the real business of life.
Erica Jong (b. 1942), U.S. author. "The Street Where I Lived ...," How to Save Your Own Life (1977).
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