Ezra Pound Comments (12)

i search for canto 1
i toes rely coal cs i hv som stof am i cn spwellll
i rely coal an yu shud repct e cz i an a guud pezoins am yu aniet
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According to T. S. Eliot, “Pound is more responsible for the twentieth-century revolution in poetry than is any other individual.” He was famous for the generosity with which he advanced the work of such major contemporaries as W. B. Yeats, Robert Frost, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, H. D., James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, and especially T. S. Eliot who dedicated The Waste Land to Pound who was instrumental in editing the final version.
Ezra Pound labored for forty years writing his modern epic, called simply THE CANTOS, which is similar to calling a big novel, Chapters. Although his structure was modeled on the ancient western epics, his style and voice remained essentially lyric in the Imagist tradition of his early poetry. This seems to me to be tantamount to balancing a stone lintel on piles of paperback books. Still there are numerous passages of surpassing beauty and wisdom scattered throughout the 120 completed Cantos. What is the overarching theme? Pound expected the theme to gradually reveal itself over time with his steady composition. When this theme failed to manifest itself, Pound despaired and simply stopped writing, stopped trying. He wrote various closings and farewells. One is an admission of failure, Tho' my errors and wrecks lie about me, / And I am not a demigod, / I cannot make it cohere. This is one of the last passages he wrote: Let the Gods forgive what I have made. / Let those I love try to forgive what I have made. Ezra Pound DID find his central theme. It is the need for universal forgiveness.
There was a very good reason why Eliot dedicated The Wasteland to Ezra Pound as Il Miglior Fabbro (the better maker) , as you will see if you take the trouble to read the facsimile editon of the manuscript, which shows how Pound's changes and suggestions created the poem we know today. It seems at least likely that he did the same kind of work on Prufrock. My problem with Four Quartets is that it contains passages that properly ought to have been edited out. - Christian Gehman
Pound can't really be considered madder than any other poet... St. Elizabeth's was part of the plea bargain... helped him escape execution for treason... wrote some of his best Cantos there... few people have read 'em. Even fewer have read Jefferson and or Mussolini. Possibly Pound's fascism prefigures and is emblematic of America's descent into corporatism? (fascism without the popular dictator?) after WWII....?
Pound can hardly be considered mad... certainly no madder than any other poet... St. Elizabeth's was part of his plea bargain agreement to avoid execution for treason after WWII.
tell me full reference of this poem also difficult words and word meaning including examples
Mad twentieth century poet Of brilliance!