Ezra Pound Quotes

The Image is more than an idea. It is a vortex or cluster of fused ideas and is endowed with energy.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. "Affirmations—As for Imagisme," pt. 7, Selected Prose 1909-1965, ed. William Cookson (1973).
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In verse one can take any damn constant one likes, one can alliterate, or assone, or rhyme, or quant, or smack, only one MUST leave the other elements irregular.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Letter, July 30, 1920, to Ford Madox Ford. Published in Pound/Ford: The Story of a Literary Friendship, ed. Brita Lindberg-Seyersted (1982).
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As cool as the pale wet leaves of lily-of-the-valley
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet. Alba (l. 1). . . The Selected Poems of Ezra Pound. (1957) New Directions.
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AS A MIND, who the hell else is there left for me to take an interest IN??
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. letter, Aug. 28, 1934. quoted in A Serious Character, pt. 3, ch. 13, Humphrey Carpenter (1988). referring to Mussolini. In the opening lines of Canto 74, first of Pound's Pisan Cantos (written in 1948 while he was awaiting trial for treason), Pound spoke of "the enormous tragedy of the dream in the peasant's bent shoulders." Interviewed in May 1945, he had described Mussolini as "a very human, imperfect character who lost his head."
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Winter is icummen in, Lhude sing Goddamm, Raineth drop and staineth slop, And how the wind doth ramm!
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet. Ancient Music (l. 1-4). . . The Selected Poems of Ezra Pound. (1957) New Directions.
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I guess the definition of a lunatic is a man surrounded by them.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Quoted in Charles Olson and Ezra Pound, Catherine Seelye (1975). Said to poet and critic Charles Olson in 1945, when Olson visited Pound in Howard Hall, the institution for the criminally insane in which Pound was detained pending a judgment on his wartime broadcasts from Rome.
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I Am here a Poet, that doth drink of life As lesser men drink wine.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. And Thus in Nineveh.
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If I could believe the Quakers banned music because church music is so damn bad, I should view them with approval.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. letter, Aug. 23, 1917, to Pound's father. quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 1, ch. 2 (1988). Pound's grandfather was a Quaker.
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It was you that broke the new wood, Now is a time for carving. We have one sap and one root— Let there be commerce between us.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet. A Pact (l. 6-9). . . The Selected Poems of Ezra Pound. (1957) New Directions.
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The worst mistake I made was that stupid, suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 5 (1988). Said in conversation with Allen Ginsberg in June 1968.
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