Ezra Pound Quotes

A master of men was the Goodly Fere, A mate of the wind and sea, If they think they ha' slain our Goodly Fere They are fools eternally. I ha' seen him eat o' the honey-comb Sin' they nailed him to the tree.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet. Ballad of the Goodly Fere (l. 49-54). . . The Selected Poems of Ezra Pound. (1957) New Directions.
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The art of letters will come to an end before A.D. 2000.... I shall survive as a curiosity.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Letter, January 1, 1910, to Pound's mother. quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 5, ch. 6 (1988).
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With one day's reading a man may have the key in his hands.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Canto 74, Pisan Cantos (1948). In contrast, Pound had once confided to William Carlos Williams that, "It is not necessary to read everything in a book in order to speak intelligently of it," adding, "Don't tell everybody I said so." (Quoted in Williams' Kora in Hell (1920) p.13).
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A fit abode for a poet. Stage setting at least correct.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Letter, summer 1908. Quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 2, ch. 1 (1988). Pound spent four months in Venice before settling in London.
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As a lone ant from a broken ant-hill from the wreckage of Europe, ego scriptor.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Canto 76, The Pisan Cantos (1948).
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The intellect is a very nice whirligig toy, but how people take it seriously is more than I can understand.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Letter (undated) to Pound's mother. quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 5, ch. 6 (1988).
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WOT IZZA COMIN'? I'll tell you wot izza comin' Sochy-lism is a-comin'.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet. "Canto 77."
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I don't so much write as I roar; a Newtechnique/vurry funny after WRITING.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Letter, June 18, 1941, to his U.S. publisher, James Laughlin. quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 2, ch. 13 (1988). Remarking on his wartime broadcasts from Rome.
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"But thou, O King, I bid remember me, unwept, unburied, "Heap up mine arms, be tomb by sea-bord, and inscribed: "A man of no fortune, and with a name to come.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet. Canto I (l. 54-56). . . The Cantos of Ezra Pound. (1970, repr. 1991) New Directions.
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I could I trust starve like a gentleman. It's listed as part of the poetic training, you know.
Ezra Pound (1885-1972), U.S. poet, critic. Letter, 1908, to Pound's father. quoted in Humphrey Carpenter, A Serious Character, pt. 2, ch. 1 (1988).
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