Friedrich Nietzsche Quotes

Perhaps no one as yet has been truthful enough about what "truthfulness" is.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 5, p. 103, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 177 (1886).
What is done out of love always takes place beyond good and evil.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Beyond Good and Evil, "Fourth Part: Maxims and Interludes," section 153 (1886).
He who sees little always sees a little less; he who hears badly always hears a little more.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 329, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 544, "Seeing Badly and Hearing Badly," (1878).
Knowing things halfway is a greater success than knowing things completely: it takes things to be simpler than they really are and so makes its opinions more easily understandable and persuasive.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 335, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Human, All-Too-Human, "Man Alone With Himself," aphorism 578, "Knowing Things Halfway," (1878).
Men who think deeply appear to be comedians in their dealings with others because they always have to feign superficiality in order to be understood.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 485, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Mixed Opinions and Maxims, aphorism 232, "The Profound," (1879).
Objectivity and justice have nothing to do with one another.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 1, p. 290, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980); On the Advantage and Disadvantage of History for Life, p. 35, trans. by Peter Preuss, Indianapolis, Hackett Publishing Company (1980). On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life, section 6 (1874). Published as the second essay in Nietzsche's Untimely Meditations (1873-1876).
What does your conscience say?—"You must become who it is that you are."
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 3, p. 519, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Gay Science, first edition, "Third Book," aphorism 270 (1882). A recurrent theme in Nietzsche's writings which derives from Pindar's Pythian Odes (2.73) and supplies the subtitle of his own spiritual autobiography, Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is (prepared for publication 1888, published posthumously 1908).
Before we go seeking man we will have to have found the lantern.—Will it have to be the Cynic's lantern?
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 2, p. 553, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). The Wanderer and His Shadow, aphorism 18, "The Modern Diogenes," (1880).
Regarding life, the wisest men of all ages have judged alike: it is worthless.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 6, p. 67, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Twilight of the Idols, "The Problem of Socrates," section 1 (prepared for publication 1888, published 1889).
Do not be deceived! The busiest people harbor the greatest weariness, their restlessness is weakness—they no longer have the capacity for waiting and idleness.
Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900), German philosopher, classical scholar, critic of culture. Friedrich Nietzsche, Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe, vol. 10, p. 201, selection 5[1], number 129, eds. Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, Berlin, de Gruyter (1980). Unpublished fragments dating to November 1882February 1883. Originally meant to be attributed to Zarathustra in Thus Spoke Zarathustra.