Fulke Greville Quotes

when this life is from the body fled, To see it selfe in that eternall Glasse, Where time doth end, and thoughts accuse the dead, Where all to come, is one with all that was; Then living men aske how he left his breath, That while he lived never thought of death.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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Sweet Cupid's shafts, like destiny, Doth causeless good or ill decree. Desert is born out of his bow, Reward upon his wing doth go. What fools are they that have not known That Love likes no laws but his own!
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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The worth that worthiness should move Is love, that is the bow of Love. And love as well the foster can As can the mighty nobleman. Sweet saint, 'tis true you worthy be, Yet without love nought worth to me.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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In night when colours all to black are cast, Distinction lost, or gone down with the light; The eye—a watch to inward senses placed, Not seeing, yet still having power of sight— Gives vain alarums to the inward sense
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Man, dreame no more of curious mysteries, As what was here before the world was made, The first Mans life, the state of Paradise, Where heaven is, or hell's eternall shade, For Gods works are like him, all infinite; And curious search, but craftie sinnes delight.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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I bow'd not to thy image for succession, Nor bound thy bow to shoot reformed kindness, Thy plays of hope and fear were my confession, The spectacles to my life was thy blindness; But Cupid now farewell, I will go play me, With thoughts that please me less and less betray me.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Three things there be in man's opinion dear, Fame, many friends, and fortune's dignities: False visions all, which in our sense appear, To sanctify desire's idolatry.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.
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And images of self-confusednesses Which hurt imaginations only see— And from this nothing seen, tells news of devils, Which but expressions be of inward evils.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet. Caelica (l. 43-46). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Hard-hearted minds relent and rigor's tears abound, And envy strangely rues his end, in whom no fault was found. Knowledge her light hath lost, valor hath slain her knight, Sidney is dead, dead is my friend, dead is the world's delight.
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet, and Sir Edward Dyer (c. 1540-1607), British poet. Epitaph on Sir Philip Sidney (attributed to Greville) (l. 5-8). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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Silence augmenteth grief, writing increaseth rage,
Fulke Greville (1554-1628), British poet, and Sir Edward Dyer (c. 1540-1607), British poet. Epitaph on Sir Philip Sidney (attributed to Greville) (l. 1). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
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