Galway Kinnell Quotes

this one whom habit of memory propels to the ground of his making, sleeper only the mortal sounds can sing awake, this blessing love gives again into our arms.
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. After Making Love We Hear Footsteps (l. 21-23). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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after making love, quiet, touching along the length of our bodies, familiar touch of the long-married,
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. After Making Love We Hear Footsteps (l. 10-11). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
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A boy's hunched body loved out of a stalk The first song of his happiness, and the song woke His heart to the darkness and into the sadness of joy.
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. First Song (l. 16-18). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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There is something joyous in the elegies Of birds. They seem Caught up in a formal delight, Though the mourning dove whistles of despair.
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. Flower Herding on Mount Monadnock (l. 25-28). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
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The appeal to heaven breaks off. The petals begin to fall, in self-forgiveness. It is a flower. On this mountainside it is dying.
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. Flower Herding on Mount Monadnock (l. 75-78). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
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the sheer blue milken dreaminess spurting and shuddering from the fourteen teats into the fourteen mouths sucking and blowing beneath them: the long, perfect loveliness of sow.
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. Saint Francis and the Sow (l. 21-23). . . Norton Introduction to Poetry, The. J. Paul Hunter, ed. (3d ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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The bud stands for all things, even for those things that don't flower,
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. Saint Francis and the Sow (l. 1-3). . . Norton Introduction to Poetry, The. J. Paul Hunter, ed. (3d ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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I take a wolf's rib and whittle it sharp at both ends and coil it up and freeze it in blubber and place it out on the fairway of the bears.
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. The Bear (l. 9-13). . . Room for Me and a Mountain Lion; Poetry of Open Space. Nancy Larrick, comp. (1974) M. Evans and Company.
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the rest of my days I spend wandering: wondering what, anyway, was that sticky infusion, that rank flavor of blood, that poetry, by which I lived?
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. The Bear (l. 90-94). . . Room for Me and a Mountain Lion; Poetry of Open Space. Nancy Larrick, comp. (1974) M. Evans and Company.
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you in San Quentin, who wrote, "Being German my hero is Hitler," instead of "Sincerely yours," at the end of long, neat-scripted letters demolishing the pre-Raphaelites:
Galway Kinnell (b. 1927), U.S. poet. The Correspondence School Instructor Says Goodbye to His Poetry Students (l. 9-13). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
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