Geoffrey Chaucer Quotes

With hym ther was a plowman, was his brother, That hadde ylad of dong ful many a fother.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400), British poet. General Prologue (l. 531-532). . ; from THE CANTERBURY TALES Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(0) (0)
For which he wex a litel red for shame, Whan he the peple upon him herde cryen, That to beholde it was a noble game, How sobreliche he caste doun his yen. Criseyda gan al his chere aspyen, And let so softe it in her herte sinke That to herself she seyde, "Who yaf me drinke?"
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400), British poet. Troilus and Criseyde, bk. 2, l. 645-51 (c. 1385), repr. In The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. Alfred W. Pollard, et al. (1898).
(0) (0)
in that seson on a day In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage To Caunterbury with ful devout corage, At nyght was come into that hostelrye Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400), British poet. General Prologue (l. 19-24). . ; from THE CANTERBURY TALES Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(1) (0)
O yonge fresshe folkes, he or she, In which that love up-groweth with your age, Repeyreth hoom fro worldly vanitee, And of your herte up-casteth the visage To thilke God that after his image Yow made, and thynketh al nis but a faire This world, that passeth sone as floures faire.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400), British poet. Troilus and Criseyde, bk. 5, l. 1835-41 (c. 1385), repr. In The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. Alfred W. Pollard, etc. (1898).
(1) (0)
With hym ther was his sone, a yong squier, A lovyere and a lusty bacheler, With lokkes crulle as they were leyd in presse. Of twenty yeer of age he was, I gesse. Of his stature he was of evene lengthe, And wonderly delyvere, and of greet strengthe.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400), British poet. General Prologue (l. 79-84). . ; from THE CANTERBURY TALES Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
(0) (0)
Ye knowe eek, that in forme of speche is chaunge Withinne a thousand yeer, and wordes tho That hadden prys, now wonder nyce and straunge Us thinketh hem; and yet they spake hem so, And spedde as wel in love as men now do; Eek for to winne love in sondry ages, In sondry londes, sondry ben usages.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400), British poet. Troilus and Criseyde, bk. 2, l. 22-8 (c. 1385), repr. In The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. Alfred W. Pollard, et al. (1898).
(0) (0)
So hath your beaute fro your herte chaced
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400), British poet. Merciles Beaute (l. 14). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(0) (0)
Your yen two wol slee me sodenly, I may the beaute of hem not sustene, So woundeth hit through-out my herte kene.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400), British poet. Merciles Beaute (l. 1-3). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(0) (0)
For of fortunes sharp adversitee The worst kynde of infortune is this, A man to han ben in prosperitee, And it remembren, whan it passed is.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400), British poet. Pandarus, in Troilus and Criseyde, bk. 3, l. 1625-8 (c. 1385), repr. In The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. Alfred W. Pollard, et al. (1898). The same thought appears in bk. 2 of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, translated by Chaucer: "For in all adversitee of fortune, the most unsely kinde of contrarious fortune is to han been weleful." Similarly in Dante, Inferno, canto 5, see Dante on "regret."
(0) (0)
I had most need of blessing, and "Amen" Stuck in my throat. The point is that you can't be too greedy. Certes, they been lyk to houndes, for an hound whan he comth by the roser, or by other bushes, though he may nat pisse, yet wole he heve up his leg and make a contenaunce to pisse.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400), British poet, and Tony Schwartz. "Parson's Tale: Sequitur de Luxuria," sect. 855, The Canterbury Tales, published in The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer, ed. Alfred W. Pollard, et al. (1898). Written with Tony Schwartz.
(0) (0)